New & Used Aspirator, Emergency

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: Medical Specifics
Model: 2200
Premium User
Location: United States, Washington
Rating: 89%
230
-

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: Squire - Cogswell Aeros
Model: Care-E-Vac AC
Premium User
Location: United States, Washington
Rating: 89%
230
-

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: Squire - Cogswell Aeros
Model: Care-E-Vac AC
Premium User
Location: United States, Washington
Rating: 89%
230
-

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: Laerdal
Model: 2358
Location: Poland, Wielkopolskie
Negotiable
-

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: DeVilbiss
Model: 7305 Series
Location: United States, Michigan
225
This Seller accepts SafeTrade as a payment method
2009

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: Medela
Model: Vario 18
Location: United States, Minnesota
Rating: 92%
Negotiable
-

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: Laerdal
Model: LCSU 88 00 01
Location: United States, Minnesota
Rating: 92%
125
-

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: Laerdal
Model: LCSU 88 00 01
Location: United States, Minnesota
Rating: 92%
125
-

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: Ambu
Model: Uni-Suction Pump
Location: United States, Florida
125
-

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: Medela
Model: Vario 18
Location: United States, Massachusetts
1,500
-

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: FAHL
Model: Tracheofirst
Location: Germany, Bavaria
Rating: 93%
313
2005

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Device: Aspirator, Emergency
Manufacturer: Statvac
Model: Flynn Series 3
Location: United States, California
150
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Aspirator, Emergency may also be referred to as :

Emergency Aspirator | Battery-Powered Emergency Aspirator | Aspirator | AC-DC Aspirator
 

Tips for buying Aspirator, Emergency

  1. Emergency aspirator units are commonly used outside clinic or hospital settings, and must-be-easy to use and transport.
  2. The vacuum level of the emergency aspirator should reach 300 mm Hg in 4 sec or less. Emergency aspiration could require moderate to high vacuum and flow rates. It should be able to provide suction of at least 400 mm Hg at maximum settings to remove tenacious secretions, while allowing lower vacuum levels as well, to prevent tissue damage.
  3. The vacuum gauges and vacuum limiting devices help to ensure appropriate and safe suction levels, and they should be read easily and accurately.
  4. All the collection canisters, disposable or reusable, should hold at least 1 L of liquid to prevent overflow of aspirated material that is infectious and might clog the battery-powered emergency aspirator.
  5. Emergency Aspirators should weigh less than 6 kg. Units that are used for crash cart only, can be heavier.
  6. The emergency aspirator unit should perform at maximum vacuum for at least 30 minutes when batteries are fully charged. It should provide audible and visual warnings when depletion is close.
  7. To prevent loss of the charger, integral battery chargers are preferred to separate battery-powered emergency aspirator units.
  8. All the controls and connections must be clearly marked.
  9. For emergency aspirator units used for pharyngeal suctioning only, vacuum regulators or gauges are optional. A model without these options is cheaper and simpler to operate. However, if a vacuum gauge is indeed included, it should be installed properly to prevent falsely low readings that will cause higher than intended vacuum levels.
  10. When measuring vacuum levels, the end of the tubing must be occluded. This should be kept in the mind of all users considering the use of relatively high vacuum levels for tracheal suctioning, because excessive vacuum levels can cause trauma.
  11. Using the emergency aspirator should be easy and intuitive, including turning it on, adjusting and operating it, setting it to maximum vacuum for pharyngeal suctioning, emptying, exchanging or disposing canisters and continuing to operate the pump without significant risk of contaminating the instrument or the operator.
  12. Installed filters supplied with the canisters will differ with different emergency aspirator models; some may severely limit airflow rates.
Read more valuable tips on the Medical Equipment Buying Guide by MedWOW >>