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New & Used EMG & Evoked Potential Response Unit

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Device: EMG & Evoked Potential Response Unit
Manufacturer: J & J
Model: M-53
Premium User
Location: United States, Washington
Rating: 89%
949
This Seller accepts SafeTrade as a payment method
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Device: EMG & Evoked Potential Response Unit
Manufacturer: J & J
Model: M-57
Premium User
Location: United States, Washington
Rating: 89%
180
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Device: EMG & Evoked Potential Response Unit
Manufacturer: Dantec
Model: Keypoint 4
Location: France, Bourgogne
5,336
2009

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Device: EMG & Evoked Potential Response Unit
Manufacturer: Medtronic
Model: NIM-Neuro 3.0
Location: United States, California
16,000
This Seller accepts SafeTrade as a payment method
2010

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Device: EMG & Evoked Potential Response Unit
Manufacturer: Dantec
Model: Keypoint 4
Location: France, Bourgogne
4,743
2005
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EMG & Evoked Potential Response Unit may also be referred to as :

Evoked Potential Graphic Recorder Electromyograph | EP Unit | Evoked Potential Recorder | Evoked Potential Analyzer | Evoked Response Unit | BERA | Audiometric Evoked Potential Unit | Evoked Potential Electromyograph | EMG | Brainstem Evoked Response Audiometry
 

Tips for buying EMG & Evoked Potential Response Unit

  1. Facilities should consider the following factors before making the purchase: reliability, safety, supplier service support, the initial cost of the unit and its accessories, and the cost of electrode replacement.
  2. Some additional factors to consider include computer software and combined usage as an EP unit. Systems that can be upgraded have an advantage.
  3. To narrow down the list of devices to consider, facilities should decide on the intended applications. If the device will be used only for auditory EPs, devices without this capability can be eliminated, as can those that provide a comprehensive set of capabilities, including auditory, visual, and somatosensory EPs - since they would be more costly. However, if the device is to be used for a wide range of applications, only a comprehensive set of capabilities should be considered.
  4. When purchasing any type of EP graphic recorder, buyers should consider some data management capabilities. A computer interface is highly recommended to transfer collected data to an information system. The unit should also be able to store data, preferably on a hard drive and removable media, and must have a waveform display capable of showing at least eight waveforms simultaneously. A printer to provide hard copies of collected information is desirable as well as an artifact-rejection option.
  5. It is possible to expand EP unit capabilities to include electromyography and electro-oculography. This can be cost-effective because it often eliminates the need to purchase a dedicated system for those procedures.
  6. EP users should be trained in using the systems and interpreting the results. Certification as a clinical neuro-physiologist is required, and the technician administering the tests should also receive training in patient preparation.
  7. Depending on facility preference, the electric stimulator can be either sub dermal or surface. The auditory stimulator should be capable of producing broadband clicks and noise masking at the minimum. Insert earphones are also recommended, and the minimum signal produced should be 5 to 50 pulses per second at an intensity of 0 to 100 dB SPL. The visual stimulator should include a checkerboard capable of at least 1 to 50 reversals per second.
Read more valuable tips on the Medical Equipment Buying Guide by MedWOW >>